Thursday, May 31, 2012

NY Mayor Bloomberg Wants to Ban Large Sugary Drinks to Reduce Obesity--What Do You Think?

Mayor Bloomberg is really stirring up the pot.  He wants to ban the sale of large sugary drinks in NYC in an effort to control obesity.  Obesity rates in adults there are at nearly 60% and 40% for children.  I am all for him trying to do something about obesity, but is this the way to go?  Do we really want government regulating what size soda we can purchase at a restaurant?

That being said, obesity is a HUGE (no pun intended) problem in the U.S. and government agencies, private agencies and citizens end up paying for it in healthcare costs--whether you are obese or not.  I can tell you that I am tired of paying increased insurance costs due to other people's health problems, a good percentage which are due to conditions caused by obesity.  I choose to eat healthy, skip sodas and exercise for good health, yet I am opening up my pocket book to pay for for their poor choices.  And I am sure that Mayor Bloomberg is concerned about the health of his citizens for many reasons.  Obesity drives insurance rates up, can result in loss of work and less productivity.  It has emotional consequences on individuals as well.

So, maybe his tactics aren't the best solution, but I do applaud him for trying something.

Oh, and by the way, I do know someone who lost a significant amount of weight--around 30 pounds.  When I asked her how she did it, her response was that she gave up sodas...


6 comments:

Ruth Cox said...

While I am FOR all of us doing our best to have healthy bodies and minds, I am AGAINST the government having a controlling interest in such matters. We must retain our freedom and our right to choose even if it means we make some not-so-good choices.

Julie Wood said...

I do not think that Mayor Bloomberg has the right to make people's food or drink choices! I do not agree! There are more important things to do like solve the crime problem in New York!

Elizabeth Towns said...

Can a Mayor actually ban soft or sweet drinks? I personally think people should consider what they are putting into their bodies, just like I have to make those considerations - but the Mayor is not gonna tell me what those choices are by mandating them. What he CAN do is put in place a campaign that encourages a healthy alternative. I am sure he would be sued from here to kingdom come if he tried to ban some drinks.

Beth said...

I think there are several other options than controlling what we consume. Better health education for all, better incentives or consequences in the insurance dept. (Benefits/reductions for those that aren't obese or as they lose the obesity and increase the insurance of those that are.) But, in the end, it's up to the individual, not the government, to decide how we eat.

Petula Wright said...

Ann?! I love this post! For a couple of reasons: Love the ending and because I complain every single time I order a meal from a fast food restaurant and the drink is a gallon! I don't want a super sized drink. Can the automatically super size my water? No one needs that much liquid sugar. It may be extreme, what the mayor is suggesting, but when is someone gonna take a true step in putting their foot down and helping people help themselves.

In an unrelated story about the rights of women in other countries, I felt the same way. Although I wouldn't want to go to such extremes, but there is some credit to those measures. We have too much leniency and such in the US. We abuse it and ourselves. Someone has to put their foot down with something. IJS

StuffSmart said...

I agree with Beth. (Did I just say that? LOL Beth :))

Yes, obesity is a problem but I don't think government control of food portions is the way to go. Also, the ban does not include diet sodas so is essentially worthless. Multiple studies have proven that sugar substitutes like the ones used in diet sodas act as appetite stimulants when being processed by the body.

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